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Tag Archives: LinkedIn

LinkedIn Endorsements – Do we need to learn some etiquette?

Having endorsed people at LinkedIn, and getting endorsed by people for my skills, came a strange thought in my mind: Is there a need to have some etiquette; when you are on a strong platform as LinkedIn?

Question comes in mind is: What is the difference between endorsement v/s recommendation? For sure these two are different…and the difference is? In simple sense; recommendation is more painful [You got to write a almost a para for your connection] where as endorsement is “one-click” way to give kudos to a contact and they are based on the skills you have entered into your profile, according to the LinkedIn blog.

Endorsement gives more credibility to your profile, as it lets the visitor of your profile know that all those skills which you have added were not just ‘Added;; there are people who really are verifying this fact.

For now my LinkedIn feed is filled with people endorsing, and getting endorsed…for sure at some stage this ‘New Feature’ would also fade out…however when it comes to etiquette on endorsements; there is only one; and that is absolutely un-official:  I call it “Respect the Reciprocity”.

If you are getting endorsed by someone in your network, though it’s not necessary for you to endorsed the person for same number of skills, but as a matter of ‘Spirit of Reciprocity’, you should go ahead and endorse the person for skills you know he possess.

Make sure not to flood your contacts with endorsement; as that may result in ‘Give and Take’ kind of approach, which social platforms are quick to discard…you may end up spoiling or at the least hurt the authenticity of your  connection.

For sure; it is not ethical to claim possession of a skill that you have not earned,so if you end up getting endorsed for a skill which you don’t possess, what you should do? Can Linked In come up with a way to give me an option of saying ‘I don’t deserve to be endorsed for this skill’?

I might be thinking too loud here, but being ethical and maintaining authenticity is a must for having a successful and long lasting career.

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Posted by on March 13, 2013 in Blogging, Productivity, Social Media

 

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CMMi – Maturity Levels – Initial – Managed – Defined

CMMi – Introduction to Development 1.3 : This is where we discussed about introduction to CMMi! Let’s move ahead and learn a bit more about Maturity and its associated parlance in real life.

So after understanding a bit about CMMi processes, what they are, what type os levels do we have in CMMi (Performed, Managed, Defined and so on…O. So let’s talk about this: If I ask you what processes are you following in your organization or in your project or do you even follow a process while you come to office from your home? Well the answer to all these is YES! There is process involved at each and every step of your journey. You learn alphabet via processes, you learn to cook via processes, you learn to drive via process…and each and every process and its stage is Performed, Managed, Defined, and then Optimized…

CMMi Maturity Level

CMMi Maturity Levels

In Tekriti is at 1 and or 2. We have been doing 3 all the way of our journey, but what we haven’t been doing is the organized way! We have been reactive most of the time and occasionally pro-active. So why shall we improve? For Clients? For our CEO? For our Business? No…No…No…You should improve for yourself…rest all will follow. As someone rightly pointed out, “If we do what we have been doing throughout the day in an efficient and effective manner, half of the “Innovation” is done!”

Maturity Level Details:

Maturity levels consist of a predefined set of process areas. The maturity levels are measured by the achievement of the specific and generic goals that apply to each predefined set of process areas. The following sections describe the characteristics of each maturity level in detail.

Maturity Level 1 – Initial

At ML (Maturity Level) 1, processes are ad hoc and chaotic. There is no stable environment in the Organization. Success in these organizations depends on the competence and heroics of the people in the organization (Remember I mentioning about depending on Heroes) and not on the use of proven processes.

ML 1 organizations will be able to execute the work; however, they frequently exceed the budget and schedule of their projects.

ML 1 organizations are characterized by a tendency to over commit, abandon the processes in the time of crisis, and not be able to repeat their past successes. This is very crucial, not able to repeat the success of the past. Does this remind you something? Did I hear some one say Uhh….kinda happened to me and my project? Believe me you’re not alone!

Maturity Level 2 – Managed

At ML 2, an organization has achieved all the specific and generic goals of the maturity level 2 process areas. This is highly significant, as this is the building block for all your further activities. Doing Generic Goals and Specific ones, make it easier for you to have a kick start to ML3. The projects of the organization have ensured that requirements are managed and that processes are planned, performed, measured, and controlled.

At this level we maintain that the existing practices are retailed during stress times…if the practices are in place then you have a better and managed performance according to the plan

At this level you have requirements, processes, work products, and services all managed. The entire status of the work related products (Like Requirement docs, Project Plan, Estimation etc.) along with the delivery of services are visible to management at defined points.

All te stakeholders are kept involved, they know about where we are…what is left and so on….

Maturity Level 3 – Defined

At ML 3, an organization has achieved all the specific and generic goals of the process areas assigned to maturity levels 2 and 3. There is a massive learning curve from processes perspective here at level 3.

A critical distinction between maturity level 2 and maturity level 3 is the scope of standards, process descriptions, and procedures.

At ML 2, the standards, process descriptions, and procedures differ from project to project, there is NO Organization level standard among the processes being followed. We do this and are good, and you do another one, and you also survive, but there is no STANDARD Org level process form which we can tailor all our prject level processes.

At maturity level 3, the standards, process descriptions, and procedures for a project are tailored from the organization’s set of standard processes to suit a particular project or organizational unit.

The processes that are performed across the organization are consistent except for the differences allowed by the tailoring guidelines.

Another critical distinction is that at maturity level 3, processes are managed more proactively using an understanding of the interrelationships of the process activities and detailed measures of the process.

Since we are targeting the CMMi V1.3, and hence I am not going in the details of ML4 and ML5.

 
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Posted by on January 16, 2012 in Blogging, Product Management, Product Marketing

 

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Android Eco System and its viability

Android market share is eclipsing all competitors increasing from 2% two years ago to over 50%. Android Market has over 500k apps. Andy Rubin twitted this month that about 800k Android devices are activated every day. Android has been a billion+ dollar business for Google for 1.5 years. The business is good, right? While the short term gains are very impressive there are 4 fundamental problems with Android ecosystem which raises questions about its future.

·        Patents and insufficient of intellectual property portfolio. The main Android value proposition to OEMs was free license. Now increasingly OEMs, such as HTC and Samsung, are paying patent royalties to Microsoft higher than licensing fees for Windows Phone. OEMs also pay royalties to Apple and in selected markets was banned. Most recently courts ruled in favor of Microsoft against Motorola Mobility which is being acquired by Google.Android is no longer free. To maintain margins at the same level OEMs will have to cut cost at the expense of hardware, which will diminish user experience. OEMs will no longer have incentive to favor Android when Windows Phone is a viable option.
·         Fragmentation. Second biggest value proposition was Android openness. Anybody can take the source code and change it to fit their needs. Leading OEMs, such as Samsung, HTC and Motorola have blended their brands and color schemes into Android devices. They also have changed source code making apps not compatible across different devices. It frustrates developers and users. Google has tried to control that to some extent which received cold reaction from the ecosystem stakeholders.
·         Security. Android Market has no barriers of entry for malicious software makers. Scammers can have an app published within minutes and Google does not verify if the app is legitimate or even works. Google has been very proactive removing malware postpartum, which is often too late – damage is done. Competitors, such as Microsoft are using it to lure away the Android users burned by scam artists. Sooner rather than later Google will face “Toyota problem”, when strong brand known for quality was hit by nemerous safety defects losing it’s global leadership in car sales as a result.
·         Slower market share growth. When a product has a lion share of the market (Android commands over 50%) the remaining half is much harder and takes longer to acquire. When you reach the bell curve the market segment is very different and requires different approach.
 
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Posted by on January 4, 2012 in Android, Mobile Applications

 

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Never Start Innovation with an Idea

Are you trying to come up with the next big idea to jump-start innovation in your company? Try another approach. Gijs van Wulfen gives us three reasons why you should not start an innovation initiative with new ideas, rather formulate a clear and concrete innovation assignment. Here’s how!

The fuzzy front end of innovation confronts you with a lot of questions. Please have a look at book ‘Creating innovative Products and Services’ where author tried to solve this with the FORTH innovation method.

Never start product or service innovation with an idea. Of course: innovation is initially about ideas. About getting the right ones. And realising these ideas in practice. A shining light bulb has become a global symbol for innovation. Just check Google images and type innovation and then you will see proof of this.

There are three reasons why you should not start with an idea.

  1. An idea makes you blind. Once you got your idea you will probably fall in love with it. That’s a great feeling indeed. But love makes blind, unfortunately. The psychological phenomenon of selective perception will make you see only the positive points of the idea and only listen to people who are supporting you. And in trying to realise the idea you will run in 80 percent of the cases into a hard wall, which will wake you up. Not having an alternative available to realise your personal challenge.
  2. It’s very difficult to convince others. What happens when you tell your idea to someone else? Their first reaction starts often with a ‘but……….’. Others within your company will start criticising your idea the moment it is told to them. An important reason is that the idea is not theirs. Furthermore companies and organisations are organised to get a grip on the current operational processes and to give account of the results produced. Should the size and complexity of the organisation increase, innovation becomes more difficult. The process of innovation seems almost unnatural. A solution is getting ideas together in a team setting so the ownership of the idea is shared.
  3. Only one and a half out of seven new product ideas is really introduced. A number of studies on new product innovation (Robert G. Cooper, 2011) showed that for every seven new-product ideas, about 4 enter development, 1.5 are launched and only 1 succeeds. These are poor odds. There is a chance of around 1 out of 5 that your idea will reach the market. So what do you do when your boss, the vice-president marketing or the innovation board stops your new product idea? Do you have any alternatives available to realise your business challenge? So never bet on one horse. That’s the message.

So, how should you start innovation?

You should never start an innovation expedition unprepared. As good preparation not only increases the chances of success but it also creates priorities, direction and the will to succeed. That’s why it is essential to start with a clear and concrete innovation assignment. This forces the top management in your company, from the start, to be concrete about the market/target group for which the innovations must be developed and which criteria these new concepts must meet. This forms the guidelines for you and your innovation team when you are underway. You can formulate the innovation assignment with the help of the following six questions:

  1. Why?  (Why do we want to innovate);
  2. Who?  (Who is the target group);
  3. Where?  (For which distribution channels, countries, regions or continents);
  4. What?  (Evolutionary or revolutionary; products, services and/or business models);
  5. When? (Intended year of introduction);
  6. Which? (Which criteria the new concepts should meet);

So in discussion with your top management, you can collectively formulate which criteria the new product/service ideas must meet as well as determine the ambition level.

 

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Why Product Managers are worth their weight in gold

Why Product Managers are worth their weight in gold

Part 1: Product Managers Gold Series – Setting Strategic Direction

This is Part 1 of a series of articles we will publish on the role of the Product Manager within the new product development process.

A Product Manager plays one of the most valuable roles within your organization: managing the ongoing profitability and viability of their product/category. This very broad and critical charge requires attention to specific responsibilities requiring specific skills and talents. This article will focus on the responsibilities as they relate to new product development.

The driving force of a product/category is its strategic direction and framework.  For your company’s innovation/new product development efforts this includes the set of Product, Platform, Market and Technology strategies, as well as Product and Technology Roadmaps.   These elements focus resources on activities that translate into innovative, differentiated and profitable products. A Product Manager that defines and executes appropriate strategies that yield a sustainably profitable product/category is truly worth their weight in gold.

Before your Product Manager gets started

In order for your Product Managers to develop the appropriate strategic framework, they first need clearly stated and communicated business and innovation strategies defined by senior management.

The business strategy defines the long-term direction, or mission, of the organization, how the organization will achieve that mission, and what measurements will allow the organization to identify progress against or achievement of that mission.

The innovation strategy defines in what ways and to what extent the organization will use innovation to execute its business strategy. This boils down to defining what resources and the extent of resources to be allocated to innovation, and the types of innovations or levels of risk the organization will undertake in the pursuit of innovation.

Why is strategy so important? We’ve worked in organizations that have clearly stated strategies and those that don’t.   The difference between the two is like night and day.  If I had to choose two words to describe the company with strategies, and those without it would be ‘clarity’ vs. ‘chaos’.

The organizations with strategies provided clarity to the team and organization.  The strategies provided direction on where the organization was going, and how it was going to get there.  Everyone had their marching orders, they knew what to do and their efforts were aligned.  It was not uncommon to see the Product Managers continually referring to these strategy documents because they provided a framework and an understanding of the resources and constraints they have to work with.

In contrast, in organizations without clearly stated business and innovation strategies we’ve seen a lot of valuable time wasted by product managers forced to develop their product/category strategies in a vacuum, trying to  infer the direction of the organization or worse, setting direction without regard to the mission of the larger organization.  This situation creates chaos for the entire organization as the various functions try to cope with different agendas, different resource requirements and different priorities.

It takes effort and time on the part of senior management to develop business and innovation strategies, but the payoff is tremendous.   Ensure that your Product Managers are well-equipped with the strategic direction of your organization.  They will then be able to develop appropriate and aligned strategies for their products/categories.

The Product Manager’s role in defining new product development strategy

The following content provides an overview of the five key strategy documents that Product Managers should consider when developing their product/category strategy framework for guiding new product development.

Product Strategies

Product strategies help guide your organization in the development and evolution of categories, product lines and products.  The product strategy includes the goals for new product development within each category ( e.g. market share, revenue, new markets), the arenas of strategic focus (the markets, technologies, product types to be focused on), spending/resource allocation for each arena and a  timeline showing the planned new product introductions.

Platform Strategies

Platforms enable your organization to create new products faster and more efficiently by bundling together elements that can be common across multiple product lines.  A platform strategy guides your organization in the development of platforms and derivative products.  The important elements of the platform strategy are defining the capabilities and limitations of the platform, as well as creating the platform’s point of differentiation.  The platform strategy is also an integral part of developing product and technology roadmaps.

Market Strategies

Market strategies guide your firm in the development of markets and distribution channels.  The market strategy defines who the target customer is, what segments will be served, what is the value proposition or point of differentiation when compared to the competition, and what distribution channels are needed to reach the customer.

Technology Strategies

Technology strategies guide your organization in the acquisition, development and application of technology to gain a competitive advantage.   The elements of the technology strategy include identification of the source of technology, as well as the timing of implementation to support the product strategy timeline.

Product and Technology Roadmaps

Product and Technology Roadmaps provide the graphical representation of the current and planned evolution of products and platforms that match market need to specific technologies.   They basically illustrate the portfolio of projects that the organization needs to work on in order to achieve its business strategy and be successful.  It especially helps the organization with forecasting required technology and the skills that need to be acquired.

Communicating the New Product Development Strategy

To be effective, these strategies must be agreed to and supported by senior management, and clearly communicated to everyone involved in new product development. Progress against these strategies needs to be openly and continually monitored, with adjustments made to react to changing market, industry and technology conditions. We recommend monthly new product development portfolio review meetings and quarterly strategy meetings with the Product Managers presenting their findings to the senior management team.

Product Managers have the ability to make a real difference for your bottom-line.   You will quickly realize that they’re worth their weight in gold by 1) Ensuring your product managers have access to business and innovation strategies created by senior management, 2) Ensuring your product managers have the time to create and update their product strategies on an on-going basis, 3) Communicating the new product development strategies to senior management and the project teams, and regularly monitoring progress.

 
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Posted by on December 28, 2011 in Product Management, Product Marketing

 

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How to generate word of mouth lead

The Four-Step Plan for Word-of-Mouth Lead Generation

“Here’s the big news,” writes Andy Sernovitz in the book Social BOOM! “It’s not social MEDIA. It’s SOCIAL media. It’s about real people and the conversations they have.” In other words, a presence at online networks like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn isn’t enough. To generate word-of-mouth leads, you’ll also need excellent social skills—and here’s how to go on the charm offensive:

Be interesting. Do you tell friends about dull companies, products or advertisements? Do you arrange introductions for people who bore you silly? Of course not. According to Sernovitz, there’s a good way to gauge your word-of-mouth potential. Simply ask: Would anyone tell a friend about this?

Make it easy. Word-of-mouth relies on a simple message—a single, memorable line that people are likely to repeat when describing your product or service. “Anything longer than a sentence is too much,” he says. “It’ll get forgotten or mangled.”

Make people happy. Customers who love your company will enthusiastically share their experiences with friends. “You will get more word of mouth from making people happy than anything else you could possibly do,” he notes.

Earn trust and respect. No one will risk her own reputation by recommending a company with a reputation for iffy business practices. But when you’re known for treating customers, partners and employees with great care, referrals become a no-brainer.

The Po!nt: Like it or not, word-of-mouth marketing is a popularity contest. And you’ll win when you get people can’t resist you, your product or service and your integrity.

SourceSocial BOOM!

 
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Posted by on November 17, 2011 in Social Media, Social Media Marketing

 

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Your company’s blog…it Sucks? It does not have to…

Some brilliant insights from Mark Schaefer, directionally all of these are good recommendations based on facts. If 71% of buyers from the 2011 buyer report from Buyersphere reference blogs as part of the first stage of buying, then it might be a good idea to have one. I talked to few small and big names who have been in to this business from past many years…and this is what they have to say:

1. Our buyers don’t use social media and alike: Well with over 750 Million people on facebook, there just might be some of your customers there. Maybe Facebook isn’t the right place for your industry, but LinkedIn is north of 200 million, so there might be a couple of buyers there for you to engage and build relationships with.

2. I don’t have time: If your competitors using social media, you better get time out from your busy schedule…How do they have the time? I guess they make the time, you should too.

3. We don’t have that much content: Really? Talk to your own CEO, talk to your customer, have their pain points and the mitigations on your blog, how about placing the call which that customer made yesterday evening, when your products did a wow for him…As marketers and product folks we are writing all the time, but if you don’t have content – ask others in your business. Who? People in development, support, professional services or wherever..you must be having many smart people working for you…

 
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Posted by on October 17, 2011 in Product Marketing

 

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